Monday
April 13, 2015

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Emily (who we are)

 

"When the world wearies and society fails to satisfy, there is always the garden." ...Minnie Aumonier
(more celebrated quotes can be found on our "quotes" page)
Cyperus esculentus

Nutsedge

This is a perennial weed that produces zillions of seeds by a very thin creeping stem. The roots are tipped by small tubers.

(more)

Pencil Cactus

Hatiora salicornioides

This epiphytic cactus is abundantly branched and can be a hanging plant as well as a potted plant. Epiphytic cacti originate from tropical United States, South America, and from Africa to Siri Lanka.

(more)

Spotted Knapweed
Spotted Knapweed
Ed's Wildflower Page
The Garden Design Book

"The Garden Design Book"

Design Magazine has created the best of the best from its magazine tradition. You will understand the plans for simplicity, the construction of perimeters, and the basis for color. (more)

Morning GloryApril 10, 2015

Emily: Is the potato plant poisonous? What gives!

Dear Emily: I recently purchased what I was told was a Potato Vine. Afterwards I read that the wilted leaves of the Potato bush or Vine are "deadly poisonous". Is it poisonous? I have a 2 year old and do not want a poisonous plant around.

 

A: Unfortunately, parts of many plants are poisonous. The Morning Glory is poisonous.

The Ipomoea batatas 'Blackie' or Sweet Potato Vine is sometimes called Morning Glory. All the plants that I have seen called the Morning Glory are in the Ipomoea species.

Catch up with our friend Patrick Vickery in Scotland: The Banana Slug Blether (a rerun)

An Ariolomax Dolichophalus - or a Banana slug to us gardeners - of which there are three types apparently, or so I'm told, quite common in some parts of America, particularly the Pacific North West. (more of The Banana Slug Blether)

(More from Patrick in Scotland)